The New Banned Book

Banned Books Week has come and gone, andt The Guardian recently reported a shift in why books are being challenged or banned. Sex, gender issues, and religion have been the staple of banned books, but The Guardian reports “a recent rise in efforts to get books banned that cover poverty and social class.” This list includes notable novels, like The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie and The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, and nonfiction books like Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich. (This increase in challenging nonfiction books about inequality is, I think, a particularly disturbing trend.)

In a time when there is increasing inequality alongside a better understanding of how diverse reading fosters empathy and understanding, the trend towards banning books is alarming. As Mary O’Hara writes, “[i]t is not just wealth that separates rich and poor, but ignorance and the absence of social contact.”

Reading is the only way that many of our young people will gain access to experiences that are different than their own. When I was in middle and high school, I vividly remember reading There Are No Children Here by Alex Kotlowitz and Savage Inequalities by Jonathan Kozol. Both books shed light on a reality that was a far cry from my suburban childhood experience and helped me refine my ideas of how the world works.

It occurs to me that this trend stems directly from our comfort level. Adults are notoriously uncomfortable talking with kids about sex (hence the prevalence of banned books that are about sex), but adults are also uncomfortable talking with kids about inequality and poverty. The exact reason why we need kids to read those books is the same reason that adults want them out of schools.

We should encourage kids to read about challenging topics, even when we are uncomfortable with the subject or disagree with the author. It’s that friction that helps students grow as readers and as people. And, hopefully reading books that address inequality will challenge young readers to start asking questions that adults may not want to hear.

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Read the lists of banned books on the American Library Association web site.

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