Extending the Discussion: Can We Continue the Conversation about Ferguson?

It’s been more than a month since the shooting in Ferguson, and schools across the country are now in session. This conversation is still relevant: more news from Ferguson, MO made the paper today, PBS organized a recent town hall meeting, and #FergusonSyllabus has sparked discussion on Twitter.

I wonder what kinds of conversations are happening in classrooms. Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich’s recent blog post Justice on the Lesson Plan, encourages teachers to engage students in a dialogue about power, race, and justice (and includes some wonderful resources). But, I admit I’m not optimistic.

First, I wonder how much time teachers are able to devote to these complex discussions. In order to effectively explore this topic students have to understand the issue, work with and through empathy, analyze and evaluate complex ideas, and be willing to participate in uncomfortable conversations. Facilitating these kinds of discussions is no easy task. I’d argue that they are some of the most challenging conversations that teachers will lead all year. I wonder how many teachers have been adequately prepared to lead students into conversations that are uncomfortable for most adults as well—my suspicion is not many. In order for schools to be a true vehicle for change we have to train teachers how to lead effective discussions about issues like Ferguson, and give them time to work with these topics everyday.

It also occurs to me that these discussions are best had in heterogeneous classrooms where a myriad of experiences and perspectives are represented. Unfortunately, those classrooms are few and far between. (Not to say that students don’t benefit from conversation, they do, but it is much easier to build empathy when students can have experiences with peers who represent opposing perspectives.)

This reminds me of my experience teaching special education in a school in Washington, DC where 99% of the students were African American and all but two teachers (me and another teacher) were African American. One of my fourth grade students approached me one day, holding the picture of her brother. He had been shot by a white police officer. “I hate white people,” she said.

“But,” I said, “I’m white.”

“No you’re not,” she responded, “I like you.”

Ultimately, for the larger conversation about Ferguson, and other issues around race and power to change, the smallest conversations, like the one, have to change first.

To start the discussion with your students, here’s an article from PBS about How to Talk to Students about Ferguson. Also, a book list of texts that can be used to teach that, as Rhuday-Perkovich puts it, Black Youth Matter can be found at her blog post. Personally, I recommend reading Rita Garcia-Williams and Jacqueline Woodson.

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